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'Operation Doorhanger' reminds UB students to be good neighbors

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Michael Mroziak/WBFO
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University at Buffalo Community Relations Specialist Dylan Steed went house to house Friday, hanging bags on door handles. The bags contain things like information about the city’s noise ordinance laws and a recycling guide. 

 

“The information is pretty general, but at the same time, I think it’s a good thing,” Steed said.

 

 

Hours before the start of UB’s biggest party weekend of the year, the bags are gentle reminders to students living in the University Heights just off South Campus to be respectful to their non-student neighbors.

 

UB planned to distribute 1,500 of these bags as part of its fourth annual “Operation Doorhanger.”

 

It’s just one of several UB and city of Buffalo efforts in recent years to combat excessive partying in the neighborhood. Two years ago, UB’s late-night bus schedule was cut down, and one major landlord was even given a consent decree to better monitor parties at his properties.

 

UB also announced new Greek life regulations Wednesday, following a possible hazing incident at a fraternity house in the neighborhood and the subsequent death of a student.

 

“It’s just another way to let our students know how to be good neighbors,” said UB Director of Community Relations Tess Morrissey about Operation Doorhanger. “It’s not the only thing we do. They hear this message at orientation so we think it’s important to always be reminding them that they’re in a neighborhood and they’re part of a community.”

 

Morriseey added that Operation Doorhanger is also about integrating students into the Buffalo community, as the bags also contain things like coupons for local businesses.

 

The packets also give students a renters’ checklist, as many homes in the area have code violations and are owned by absentee landlords.

 

The bags were also left at non-student homes, giving them information about how to call UB with concerns about student behavior.

 

Morrissey said UB wants to encourage students to meet their non-student neighbors.

 

“We always find that when students know who is living next door to them, they put a name to that face, they’re behaving better, they act like they would in their parents’ neighborhood,” she said.