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NYC paramedic speaks out against mayor's homelessness plan

Anthony Almojera is a lieutenant paramedic with the New York City Fire Department Bureau of Emergency Medical Services. (Courtesy of Anthony Almojera)
Anthony Almojera is a lieutenant paramedic with the New York City Fire Department Bureau of Emergency Medical Services. (Courtesy of Anthony Almojera)

Editor’s note: The following story deals with suicide. If you have suicidal thoughts, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255 (En Español: 1-888-628-9454; Deaf and Hard of Hearing: 1-800-799-4889). For suicide prevention resources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, click here.

A week after New York City Mayor Eric Adams announced a controversial move to stem homelessness, a longtime paramedic who has sees mental health distress on the streets daily is speaking out.

Anthony Almojera tells Here & Now‘s Deepa Fernandes that the mayor’s plan to have police involuntarily hospitalize homeless people essentially pits first responders against each other. He’s a lieutenant paramedic with the New York City Fire Department Bureau of Emergency Medical Services. He is also vice president of the EMS officers union and the author of “Riding the Lightning: A Year in the Life of a New York City Paramedic.”

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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