© 2022 Western New York Public Broadcasting Association

140 Lower Terrace
Buffalo, NY 14202

Mailing Address:
Horizons Plaza P.O. Box 1263
Buffalo, NY 14240-1263

Buffalo Toronto Public Media | Phone 716-845-7000
WBFO Newsroom | Phone: 716-845-7040
Your NPR Station
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

'Rapture' Prophet Camping: World Will 'Probably' End Quietly Next Friday

<p>Harold Camping speaks during a taping of his show <em>Open Forum</em> in Oakland, Calif., on May 23, 2011.</p>
Marcio Jose Sanchez
/
AP

Harold Camping speaks during a taping of his show Open Forum in Oakland, Calif., on May 23, 2011.

When we last heard from Harold Camping, the Family Radio broadcaster was conceding he'd been wrong about The Rapture beginning on May 21 — a prediction that had some folks selling their worldly possessions and traveling the nation to warn that the end was coming soon.

His calculations had been off, Camping said, and it was looking to him like things would really get going (or start stopping?) on Oct. 21.

That's next Friday.

Now Camping, who says he's recovering slowly from a stroke he suffered in June, has posted a new audio message. He's sounding a little less than definite, but still convinced that the end is coming soon. And he's also predicting it will all sort of happen with a whimper, not a bang.

Camping's thinking that:

-- "We're getting very near the very end."

-- Next Friday "looks like, at this point ... it will be the final end of everything."

-- When the end does come and believers are taken up to heaven, the "wicked" will not be left behind to suffer. "There will be no pain suffered by anyone because of their rebellion against God," Camping predicts, because "He has no pleasure in the death of the wicked."

-- There won't be earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other natural disasters.

"The end is going to come very, very quietly."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Mark Memmott
Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.