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Processing Social Distancing With Haiku

Social Distancing Haikus
NPR

Updated on April 28 at 5:06 p.m. ET

April is National Poetry Month, and this April, we might need poetry more than ever. Poems helps us process both the world out there and the world inside ourselves, putting words to feelings that we might have suspected were ours alone to carry.

One universal entry point to poetry: Haiku. From children to scholars, the five-seven-five rhythm is familiar and comforting.

To process this turbulent time, Life Kit asked folks to share haikus about their experiences with social distancing. Ranging from rightfully bleak to hopeful, reading these poems helped me process some of my own feelings. I hope you get something out of them too. In the slideshow below are a few favorites from listeners and NPR staff.

And if you want to dig deeper into the art form, Life Kit created a guide to help you appreciate poetry. It's not school — there's nothing to "get." Give it a try. You can ease your way into something new and meaningful.

If you want to write your own social distancing haiku, just stick this simple 3-line format: 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables — and share it with us on Twitter @NPRLifeKit with the hashtag #socialdistancinghaiku. We'll share some of our favorites in this thread:

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Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Becky Harlan is a visual and engagement editor for NPR's Life Kit.