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Schumer calls for immediate ban on e-cigarette flavors

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National Public Radio
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Sen. Chuck Schumer says the Food and Drug Administration should immediately ban e-cigarette flavors like candy and cookies that can appeal to young people in the wake of warnings that teens and children are increasingly using e-cigarettes.

“The craze among kids for e-cig flavors that resemble whipped cream, candy and cookies is not only a bad trend, but it is a recipe for disaster that is fueling an outright addiction that appears to be getting worse, not better,” said Schumer. “This e-cig nicotine laced liquid could have very serious implications on adolescent development and health. That is why it is high time to ramp up the pressure on and by the FDA so quicker action to rid the marketplace of kid-friendly e-cig flavors is taken...and we need to catch up. New York kids are in a flavor trap and it’s becoming a real epidemic now.”

The New York Democrat on Sunday released a letter to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb saying the agency had the legal authority to regulate e-cigarette flavors, and encouraging it to do so.

Schumer praised steps the FDA has taken, including issuing warning letters last week to 13 manufacturers, distributors and sellers over marketing that has e-cigarette products looking like juice boxes and candies, but wants to see more.

Health and education officials have warned that underage usage of the e-cigarettes, which are marketed as a safer alternative to traditional cigarettes, is increasing.

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