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Business/Economy

Cubs win expected to mean big business for WNY's New Era

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The Chicago Cubs' first World Series win in more than a century could be a big economic win for one Western New York company.

New Era Cap Company, headquartered in Buffalo, is preparing to sell a possibly record-high number of caps to commemorate the Cubs' World Series win.

  

"In 1990, when we were asked to make caps for the World Series, we made a little under a thousand caps," said Dana Marciniak, Director of Brand Communication at New Era. "This year, now that the Cubs have won, we will make over three million caps. That's up about 140 percent from last year."

An initial run of 200,000 caps was already in production at New Era's factory on Route 5 in Derby. Marciniak says the local plant has the capability to produce customized units and have them ready for shipping in about two to three days. 

Demand for World Series merchandise was high among fans of both contenders, given the chance for both the Cubs and Cleveland Indians to end long championship droughts. But Marciniak  it was especially high from Cubs fans. For New Era, the timing is ideal. Sales are expected to remain strong throughout the winter months, leading up to the start of next season. 

"When a team like the Cubs wins, not only do sales go up around this time, but around holiday time, and then around spring training and then around Opening Day," Marciniak said. "That's why we're predicting this really large number of three million caps or more, of specific Cubs caps that we're going to sell."

New Era has held the exclusive rights to produce Major League Baseball's on-field caps since 1993. The company's working relationships with individual clubs, though, date back to 1934, when the Indians became their first big league baseball clients.

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