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Chinese citizens find ways around censorship; China's hard landing could impact global economics

Student protesters hold up candles and placards during a commemoration for victims of a recent Urumqi apartment deadly fire blamed on the rigid anti-virus measures, held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022. On Tuesday, about a dozen people gathered at the University of Malaya, chanting against virus restrictions and holding up sheets of paper with critical slogans. (Vincent Thian/AP)
Student protesters hold up candles and placards during a commemoration for victims of a recent Urumqi apartment deadly fire blamed on the rigid anti-virus measures, held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022. On Tuesday, about a dozen people gathered at the University of Malaya, chanting against virus restrictions and holding up sheets of paper with critical slogans. (Vincent Thian/AP)

As law enforcement cracks down on Chinese citizens after a weekend of large city protests, dissenters are finding ways around the censorship imposed on social media in the country.

NPR’s Beijing Correspondent is Emily Feng and has been following the story closely. She joins Here & Now‘s Scott Tong from Taipei for the latest.

And, as Chinese law enforcement subdues the protests that sparked over the weekend, many are asking what the knock-on effect could be. New financial incentives to keep citizens happy and a change in COVID policy could be on the cards.

Roben Farzad, host of Public Radio’s “Full Disclosure,” joins Tong to look at what this weekend’s protests and the general atmosphere in the nation could mean for the nation’s economy and the impact on the rest of the world.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.