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Can Texas find its way out of the state's gridlocked gun debate?

People pray and pay their respects at the makeshift memorial for victims of the shooting that left a total of 22 people dead at the Cielo Vista Mall WalMart in El Paso, Texas, on August 6, 2019. (Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images)
People pray and pay their respects at the makeshift memorial for victims of the shooting that left a total of 22 people dead at the Cielo Vista Mall WalMart in El Paso, Texas, on August 6, 2019. (Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images)

After each mass shooting in Texas, state lawmakers vow to do something. Often, what they’ve done is further relax gun laws. But when a gunman killed 23 and wounded 26 in his home town El Paso, Democrat state representative Joe Moody begged his colleagues to find a solution.

“It was shocking to me the resistance we faced from the get go,” Rep. Moody says. “My thought was, ‘This is a perfect time to kind of dissect this. Let’s talk about it.'”

“Even colleagues on my side of the aisle showing frustration to me, ‘Why do you continue to work on this when nothing happens every single time?’ ” he says.

Today, On Point: Looking for a way out of Texas’s gridlocked gun debate.

Guests

Rep. Joe Moody, Democratic State representative serving Texas’s 78th district. (@moodyforelpaso)

Michael Cargill, owner of Central Texas Gun Works, a gun store and training facility. Host of gun-rights radio show Come and Talk It. (@michaeldcargill)

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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