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Special Report: Key Takeaways From Fiona Hill And David Holmes' Testimonies

Fiona Hill (left), the National Security Council's former senior director for Europe and Russia, and David Holmes, an official from the American Embassy in Ukraine, are sworn in to testify before the House Intelligence Committee in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill on Thursday.
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Fiona Hill (left), the National Security Council's former senior director for Europe and Russia, and David Holmes, an official from the American Embassy in Ukraine, are sworn in to testify before the House Intelligence Committee in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill on Thursday.

Two witnesses testified during the last scheduled day of public impeachment hearings on Thursday. Fiona Hill, a former National Security Council official, and David Holmes, a political counselor in the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, spoke in front of the House Intelligence Committee — wrapping up two weeks of public and closed-door testimonies to Congress about President Trump's actions in the Ukraine affair. Click the audio link to listen to a special broadcast of NPR hosts and reporters offering analysis on the significant moments of the day.

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Ailsa Chang is an award-winning journalist who hosts All Things Considered along with Ari Shapiro, Audie Cornish, and Mary Louise Kelly. She landed in public radio after practicing law for a few years.
Ari Shapiro
Ari Shapiro has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, since 2015. During his first two years on the program, listenership to All Things Considered grew at an unprecedented rate, with more people tuning in during a typical quarter-hour than any other program on the radio.