© 2022 Western New York Public Broadcasting Association

140 Lower Terrace
Buffalo, NY 14202

Mailing Address:
Horizons Plaza P.O. Box 1263
Buffalo, NY 14240-1263

Buffalo Toronto Public Media | Phone 716-845-7000
WBFO Newsroom | Phone: 716-845-7040
Your NPR Station
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

UB Students Take Tuition Protest to Albany

By Joyce Kryszak

http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/wbfo/local-wbfo-822397.mp3

Albany, NY – UB students went to Albany Monday to lobby lawmakers to end "surprise" tuition hikes. Students were notified in November that they would be hit with an extra $310 on their spring tuition bills. Tuition goes up $620 a year beginning next fall.

Students say the problem isn't so much that tuition is going up. Some years there are no increases. They say the increases are too unpredictable. And that makes it difficult for students and their families to budget for school. Joshua Boston is a junior at UB. He said lawmakers need to pass the pending legislation that would end surprise hikes.

"Last November I got a message in my inbox that said my tuition was going up $620. That's a big problem for me. I'm a student who is trying to get through school on a budget, debt free," said Boston. "That's not looking too good for that to happen. I've had to take out some loans and I'm going to be in debt when I graduate," said Boston.

Boston and a group of other students, parents and UB officials met with lawmakers asking them to pass a law that calls for regular tuition hikes. Marsha Henderson is UB Vice President for External Affairs. She said regular increases are better for UB's planning too. Henderson said there are two pending pieces of legislation that would give UB the tools to build its future.

Students are also protesting how the spring tuition increase will be used. Roughly 90 percent of the mid-year hike will go to the state's general fund to close budget deficits. Students say all the money should go to the schools to improve education.

Click the audio player above to hear Joyce Kryszak's story now or use your podcasting software to download it to your computer or iPod.