WBFO Alumni

Since our sign-on in 1959, WBFO has had hundreds of notable staff members and volunteers. Many are also graduates of our licensee, the University at Buffalo. Here is a partial list of people who helped build the rich WBFO tradition.

NOTE: This is a work in progress. If you have additions, comments, updates or corrections, please e-mail us the details. Thanks to those of you who have provided updates, and special thanks to Mark Wozniak, Dan Sack, and Larry Osolkowski for providing much alumni information.


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Sara Abosch, WBFO graduate assistant in the late 1980s.

Christina Abt, commentator on Morning Edition

Steve Aby, WBFO bluegrass host in the 1970s.

Betty Accordino, WBFO development director in the early 1980s.

Ellis Adelstein, WBFO classical music host in the 1970s.

Larry Alexander, WBFO engineer in the early 1970s, went on to be a recording engineer in New York City.

Richie Allen, WBFO sportscaster in the early 1980s.

Marcia Alvar, WBFO program director in the 1970s, is now Project Manager for the NPR Local News Initiativ.

Dale Anderson, former WBFO music reviewer, is a reporter for the Buffalo News, who still actively participates on the air during WBFO on-air fundraisers.

Howard Arenstein, WBFO news staffer in the 1960s, is now Washington Bureau Chief and correspondent for CBS Radio news in Washington, DC.

Alex Ariemma, WBFO jazz host in the early 1990s.

Ian Aronson, WBFO News and Public Affairs Producer from 1991 to 1995, is a producer of nonfiction media in San Francisco. He is a 1997 graduate of the Stanford University Master's Program in Documentary Film and Video. While at WBFO, Ian produced several award-winning documentaries, including All In The Family, Homicide in Daily Life and The First Year, which was distributed nationally by Public Radio International.

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Traci Baars, WBFO jazz host in the early 1980s.

Jonathan "Smokey" Baer, WBFO engineer in the early 1970s, has been an engineer and producer at National Public Radio in Washington for over two decades.

Cameron Baird, head of the UB Music Department, which supplied programming when WBFO began broadcasting January 6th, 1959. (died May 6, 1960 at age 54)

Jim Bala, WBFO News Director in the late 1960s/early 1970s, active in reporting on a lot of the 1970 unrest on the UB campus and in the community during those turbulent times; he served as the Lighting Director for the Mark Russell public television show for a few years.

Babe Barlow, WBFO blues host in the 1970s. Her real name was Lucille Brown, and at age five she was discovered by movie mogul Hal Roach in an orphanage. He cast her as Farina in his Our Gang movie comedies, and she appeared in other movies in the 1930s (died August 21 1992 at age 74).

Christine Bartz, WBFO marketing and development associate and intern in the early 1990s.

Tom Bauerle, WBFO news staffer in the early 1980s, is currently a talk show host on WBEN-AM in Buffalo.

Joel Becktell, WBFO commentator and cellist with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra in the early 1990s, is now Principal Cellist with the Austin Symphony Orchestra.

David Bell, former telephone wiring technician who brought a new standard of neatness in wiring to WBFO's Master Control Studio in the old Norton Hall studios in the late 1960s.

David Benders is not yet a WBFO alumnus, but he is remembered by many station alumni, so his name is here for easy reference. David is still at WBFO after nearly three decades, and he is currently the station's Program Director and Assistant General Manager.

Pamela Benson, WBFO public affairs volunteer in the 1970s (UB BA 1976), went on to become a news writer and producer for several Buffalo radio and television stations, before becoming a charter staffer at Cable News Network (CNN) in Atlanta in 1980.

Barbara Bernheim, WBFO staffer from 1976 to 1982, including Membership Director and Business Manager 1980-1982, went on to public station WDET in Detroit for two years before settling in Montana, where she is Listener Support and Volunteer Services Manager for Yellowstone Public Radio) in Billings Montana.

Wilma Bertling, WBFO development assistant in the late 1980s. From 1956 to 1961, Wilma was Editor of Catalogues and Director of Publications for the University of Buffalo, before enjoying a long career with the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society until her stint at WBFO. While at the Historical Society, Wilma provided much help to the WBFO News Department for the 1982 Buffalo sesquicentennial series (and subsequent book) News of the Year. She is currently retired in Florida, but coordinated the 50th anniversary reunion for the yearbook staff of Syracuse University's Class of 1951.

Bill Besecker, WBFO jazz host in the 1970s and 1980s.

Doug Bevington, WBFO engineer in the 1980s, is now Senior Satellite Facilities Engineer for National Public Radio in Washington DC.

Carl Bishop, WBFO music host and producer in the early 1990s, is now a morning radio host in Houston Texas.

Larry Blasco, WBFO staffer in the late 1980s.

Jo Blatti, WBFO classical music host, and producer of the WBFO series "Buffalo Social History Project" and "The American Dream" in the 1970s.

Helene A. Blieberg, WBFO staffer in the 1970s, is now Vice President for Communications at CBS Radio in New York.

David Bloom, WBFO classical music host in the 1970s.

Marty Boratin, WBFO rock music producer (Rock Box) in the late 1980s, is with New World Record in Buffalo.

Jay Boyar, WBFO staffer in the late 1970s, was also a columnist for the old Buffalo Courier-Express newspaper until its shutdown in September 1982. Now a print journalist in Florida.

Ollie Britton, WBFO music producer in the mid 1980s.

Madeleine Brand, WBFO news staffer in the late 1980s, went on to become a correspondent for NPR affiliate WBGO in Newark, and is now at National Public Radio in Washington.

Steve Brody, WBFO jazz host in the early 1980s.

Pat Brogan, WBFO news staffer in the 1980s, was also a radio and television reporter on Buffalo commercial stations.

Mike Brydalski, WBFO staff engineer in the early 1990s, is a freelance audio engineer who still takes on projects at WBFO from time to time.

"Blues Gal" Kim Buckner, WBFO Blues host from the early 1990s until 2004, was also WBFO's receptionist.

Dave Burke may have the distinction of being the youngest volunteer to serve the station. He started in the summer of 1981 at the age of 17 and was a volunteer until 2001. He started as a board operator for Barbara Herrick (the local ATC host) and worked as a board operator for a variety of other shows too. He may have been John Werrick’s most called upon jazz host to fill in for program hosts that couldn’t make their shift. Dave also hosted a Saturday afternoon jazz program during the 80’s. From 1986-2001 he regularly covered the Buffalo Sabres for the news department and covered such events as Team Canada’s victory over Russia in Rendezvous 87 and the Sabres Stanley Cup loss to Dallas in 1999.

Paul Burke, WBFO news staffer when the station began broadcasting January 6th, 1959, host of the program Kaleidoscope.

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Tom Calandra, Buffalo musician and songwriter who featured local musicians on a WBFO program in the late 1970s named for his Buffalo recording studio, Buffalo College of Musical Knowledge (died July 19, 1998 at age 56).

Jim Campbell, WBFO General Manager in the early 1970s, is now living in Maine.

Rob Campbell, co-host of Bluegrass

Tito Candelario, co-host of WBFO's Salsa program from 1987 to March 1998.

Eulis Cathey, WBFO jazz host in the early 1980s, was also a jazz host at the old WEBR in Buffalo.

Kitty Catiga, American alley cat found wandering the WBFO studios in 1970 and adopted by Ira Flax.

Chris Caya, WBFO news intern in 2001, is now a reporter at WBEN-AM in Buffalo.

Bob Chapman, host of the WBFO oldies show When Rock Was Young, starting in 1976 (originally with co-hosts Bud Ralabate and Tom Scherer), and continuing through April 1990.

Marc Chodorow, WBFO News Director in the late 1970s, and host of Person to Person; he also worked at the old WEBR in Buffalo in the early 1980s.

Ben Clark, WBFO gospel music host in the early 1980s.

Fred Clifton, WBFO news staffer when the station began broadcasting January 6th, 1959, host of the interview program Symposium.

Bill Coleman, WBFO control board engineer in the late 1960s, now works for IBM in Poughkeepsie.

Dr. Bill Coles, WBFO jazz history features producer in the mid 1990s.

John E. Corthorn, Jr., host of folk music on WBFO in the late 1980s, who also worked as a local performer in Buffalo. In 1991, he moved to New York City and worked as a musician in Irish venues and volunteered at public radio station WFUV at Fordham University. John now lives in Western Pennsylvania, and has produced and recorded a double electric guitar album which he says, "for homemade, turned out rather nicely."

Candi Cowart, Membership Manager, 1999 - 2004

Corey Cranston, WBFO jazz host in the mid 1990s, plays guitar with the Buffalo rock band Excessive Behaviour.

Dennis Crawford, WBFO staffer in the early 1990s, now owns an Internet Company, InterAxess in Syracuse, NY.

Vinnie Curren, WBFO jazz host in the 1970s, is now general manager of public radio station WXPN in Philadelphia. Vinnie was recently elected Chairman of the NPR Station Resource Group Board of Directors.

Elizabeth Czosek (Shisler) was WBFO's Business Manager in the early 2000s.

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Deanne Daily, WBFO receptionist in the mid 1980s.

Saul Davidson, WBFO receptionist from 1991 to 1997, went on to the Kavinoky Theater at D'Youville College in Buffalo.

Debbie Davies, WBFO newscaster in the early 1980s, is now a full-time mom.

Thomas W. "Bill" Davis, general manager of WBFO in the late 1980s, became general manager of WUNC-FM in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and became Senior Vice President, Programming at National Public Radio.

Paul Dean, WBFO jazz and reggae host in the early 1980s.

Dave Debo, WBFO news staffer, and local host of Weekend Edition in the early 1990s, is now the Washington DC-based producer of First Business, a nationally syndicated TV newscast.

Dave Delaney, WBFO staffer in the 1970s (UB BA 1977), is now director of public relations for all 28 offices of Social Security in New Jersey, and host and producer of Atlantic City-based radio and television programs.

Anne Marie DeLuca, WBFO graduate assistant in the late 1990s, is the arts and entertainment editor at the Scranton Times' alternative weekly, the Electric City, in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Joe DeMarie, WBFO staffer host in the early 1990s, is now a producer at National Public Radio in Washington.

Gabe DiMaio was WBFO's UB reporter and Assistant Program Director in the 2000s. He is now the Program Director at another Buffalo NPR station, WNED 94.5FM.

Jane Donahue, hosted folk music programs in the 1960s.

Paul DuBois, WBFO engineer from 1976-1981, is now in New York City.

Walter Dziuba, WBFO volunteer and work-study student from 1976 to 1979. Walt writes, "My three years with WBFO in the old Norton Union hold some of my fondest memories of my years at UB." He went on to law school in Washington, and after graduation was posted as Administrative Attache at the US embassies in Quito Ecuador, Seoul Korea, and the US Consulate in Frankfurt Germany. He is currently a Lawyer with the Depertment of Defense in Washington, DC.

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Elliott Ehrenreich, WBFO programming intern in the 1990s, went on to Gannon University in Erie, PA, and public radio station WERG Erie, Energy FM90 (an alternative/new music/college format).

Robin Elardo, WBFO staffer in the early 1990s, became assistant director of development at the Studio Arena theatre in Buffalo.

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Marcella Faine (Marcella Branagan), WBFO classical music host in the mid 1960s, went on to teach piano at Allegheny College in Pennsylvania, and now lives in Buffalo.

Joe Farandino, WBFO staffer in the late 1960s, host of WBFO's first show on past midnight, Extension.

John Farrell, WBFO engineer in the early 1980s.

Pat Feldballe, WBFO producer and jazz host in the 1970s, is now a freelance commercial producer in Buffalo.

Carolyn Ferrini, WBFO jazz host in the early 1990s, is a singer in Buffalo.

Kamau R. E. Fields, WBFO reggae host in the mid 1990s.

Rich Firestone, WBFO engineer in the 1960s, went on to National Public Radio.

Ira Flatow, WBFO News Director in the late 1960s and early 1970s (UB Class of 1971), is the long-time host of NPR's Talk of the Nation Science Friday, heard Fridays at 2PM on WBFO.

Ira Flax, WBFO control board engineer in the late 1960s and early 1970s, is a software developer living in San Francisco, California.

Bonnie Fleischauer, WBFO Development Director in the mid 1980s.

Greg Flint, WBFO engineer who, as a UB undergraduate, helped to design and wire WBFO studios in Norton Hall in the late 1960s (died January 1980, age 27).

Carol Forman, hosted a Broadway music show in the late 1960s.

Dr. Herbert L. Foster, host of Inside Education in the mid 1980s, is Emeritus Professor of the Department of Learning and Instruction in UB's Graduate School of Education.

Chris Frank, WBFO classical music programmer and record librarian in the 1960s and 1970s, is now a librarian in Chicago.

Joe Fraser, WBFO marketing and development associate and intern in the early 1990s.

Prez Freeland, WBFO jazz host in the 1970s and 1980s, was also a jazz host at the old WEBR in Buffalo.

Roberta Friedman, WBFO folk music programmer in the 1960s and 1970s, is now an independent film producer in New York City.

Bernie Fromm, WBFO engineer/control board operator in the late 1960s, helped to wire new WBFO studios in Norton Hall. He left Buffalo to work as a sound mixer for Bill Graham's FM Productions, and now lives in California.

Mark Fruehauf, WBFO Chief Engineer in the late 1970s, is now owner of Great Water, Inc. in Erie Pennsylvania, manufacturing water desalinization and purification equipment for boats.

Theresa Fulcher, WBFO student and intern in the late 1990s.

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Ernie Galvan, WBFO news staffer in the early 1990s, graduated from Yale Law School in 1997, and is currently finishing a federal clerkship in Los Angeles.

Wally Gajewski, WBFO classical music programmer, Music Director, and host of This Is Radio in the late 1960s and early 1970s, is now the webmaster at the California State University at Long Beach.

Evelyn Garrasi Ihrke, WBFO business manager in the early 1980s, is now an artist and mother of two.

Jeff Gaudioso, WBFO jazz host and operations director in the mid 1980s, went on to become a newscaster at WGR-AM radio in Buffalo, and is now out of radio.

Ellen Gibson, WBFO children's show producer (with Arlene Sandner) in the early 1970s, is now Associate Dean for Legal Information Services at the University at Buffalo, and Director of UB's Charles B. Sears Law Library. Ellen also served for a time as chair of the WBFO Advisory Board.

Jennifer Gilroy, WBFO marketing and development associate and intern in the early 1990s, was Development Director at 91.5FM KUNV, at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas (UNLV) 1992-1996. In addition to her managerial position, she became an air personality ("Jennifah oh Jenny") on the "Rock Avenue" a program awarded as the #1 College Alternative Rock Station in America, and has relocated to New York City.

Bethany Gladkowski, WBFO membership intern in 1993.

Grant Golden, theater reviewer on Weekend Edition

Gerald Goldsman, WBFO Operetta music host in the 1970s and early 1980s (died July 1981 at age 67).

Raul Gonzalez, WBFO Hispanic programmer in the 1970s.

Sam Goodloe, WBFO jazz host in the early 1990s, went on to continue his studies at the UB School of Dental Medicine.

Ray Goodrum, WBFO blues host in the mid 1990s.

Dave Grainer, WBFO student host/DJ in 1963-65. Was in studio in Baird for Kennedy assassination and '65 Blackout. Later worked in production and management at WBTA, and WOKR and WUHF in Rochester.  Retired in Aguascalientes, México.

Howard Granat, WBFO control board operator in the late 1980s, became Director of National Research for Clear Channel Communications in New York City.

Marvin F. Granger, WBFO General Manager in the late 1970s, is now General Manager and Program Director of Yellowstone Public Radio) in Billings Montana.

Maria Greco Lucas, WBFO Business Manager in the mid 1980s.

Terry Gross, host of This Is Radio on WBFO in the 1970s (and a UB graduate), is now host of Fresh Air from Philadelphia, which is heard Monday through Thursday evenings at 7, and Sunday mornings at 7 on WBFO. In 1993, Terry was honored with a UB Distinguished Alumna Award.

Darin Guest, WBFO blues host in the early 1990s.

Dan Gurzynski, WBFO engineer in the late 1970s and early 1980s, is now a broadcast engineer with Entercom Broadcasting in Buffalo.

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Piero Hadjikakou

Fred Haier, WBFO blues host in the mid 1980s, also worked at WSPQ-AM in Springville.

Dave Haney, WBFO bluegrass host in the early 1980s.

Greg Haney, WBFO host in the 1980s, also worked at WGKT-AM and WUFO-AM in Buffalo.

Walt Hankin, WBFO news/sports staffer in the late 1980s

Misty Harris, WBFO traffic director from 2002-2004, went on to public station WFUV at Fordham University in New York in November 2004 and now works at another Buffalo NPR station, WNED.

Dr. Lincoln Harter, Director of the UB Office of Information Services, faculty advisor to the station when WBFO began broadcasting January 6th 1959.

Behi Henderson, WBFO producer, host of Womenspeak in the mid 1980s.

Beth Hoppel, WBFO business manager from 1986 to 1991 (died March 1995 at age 29).

John Hunt, WBFO jazz host and music director from the mid 1970s until his passing in September 1985 at age 33.

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Steve Ikler - Control board operator and engineer in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  Went on to become Director of Student Financial Aid at Mohawk Valley Community College in Utica, NY and for many years was the lead functional designer for "Banner Student Financial Aid" (the leading administrative system for colleges and universities in the US).  Now retired in Conshohocken, PA and Boynton Beach, FL.



Fred Jacobowitz, WBFO engineer and DJ in the early 1970s and UB alumnus (BSEE 1975), currently runs a software consulting company (Oakleigh Software Services, Inc.), and still maintains his Amateur Radio license (KE2QR). Fred was at WBFO "alongsideDave Simon, Mitch Tanenbaum, Sandy Kimmel and Dave Benders. Fondly remembers the chief engineer Fred Winters and the original hippie Bernie Fromm. We (Simon) met Bernie during our summer orientation and knew at once that this was the place for us." Fred and Dave Simon helped start UB's Carrier Current AM station WIRR: "We crawled through the underground passages connecting Norton Hall, Tower Hall, Goodyear and Clement dormitories stringing cable."

Audrey Jarosz, WBFO jazz host in the early 1980s.

Rick Jenkins, host of WBFO's Comedy Tonight in the early 1980s.

Bob Jesselson, WBFO classical music programmer in the 1960s and 1970s, now teaches music at the University of South Carolina and plays in The American Arts Trio in Columbia South Carolina.

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Aren Kagen, WBFO intern and volunteer in the late 1990s.

Alex Kaliszczak, WBFO Continuity Director when the station began broadcasting January 6th 1959.

John Karavolias, WBFO work-study assistant in the late 1990s, moved to Germany to finish a Masters Degree in Environmental Studies at the College of Applied Sciences in Stuttgart. John writes: "After that it is the hard and heavy reality of the job market. I am of course planning on coming back to the States to make the world unsafe for Environmental Violaters and other riff-raff."

Dave Karpoff, WBFO Program Director in the early 1970s.

Eli and Madeline Kaufman, WBFO staffers in the late 1960s (Madeline says theirs is a made at WBFO marriage).

Jefferson Kaye, WBFO folk music host in the mid 1960s, also served in various on-air and managerial positions in Buffalo at WKBW and WBEN radio. He became a freelance voiceover talent who also narrated for NFL Films, and was inducted into the Buffalo Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame in 2002.

Rick Kaye, WBFO jazz host in the late 1980s.

Craig Kellas, WBFO bluegrass host in the 1980s.

Randy Keller, co-host of Bluegrass

Sandy Kimmel, WBFO staffer in the early 1970s.

Steve Kirsch, WBFO Assistant Chief Engineer in the mid 1970s, went on to work at CBS, and then became an independent radio producer.

Linda Grace-Kobas, WBFO General Manager in the mid 1980s, became director of the Cornell University News Service.

Dick Kohles, WBFO Chief Engineer in the 1970s and 1980s, is now Deputy Director of Engineering with National Public Radio's Distribution Division in Washington DC.

Bruce Allen Kolesnick, WBFO News Director and Interim General Manager in the 1980s, is now Associate Director for Marketing and Programs and Campus Catering with the Office of Conferences and Special Events at the University at Buffalo.

Karen Kosman, WBFO classical music host in the 1970s, and producer of WBFO's nationally syndicated Sound of Swing in the 1980s.

Tom Krehbiel, former WBFO volunteer jazz host, is a teacher, and audio/electronics columnist for the Buffalo News.

Barbara Krug, WBFO Director of Corporate Relations from October 1995 until December 2000, later served at Western New York Public Broadcasting (Channel 17 and WNED radio) in Buffalo.

Lydia Kulbida, news staffer, music host and WBFO Music Director from 1992 to 1995, is now a television news anchor at WNYT Channel 13 in Albany, after serving as a news anchor post at WWLP-TV22 in Springfield Massachusetts.

Francesca Kurnik, WBFO administrative assistant in the early 1980s, is now a psychologist in the Buffalo Public School District.

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Ingrid Lakey, a WBFO programming assistant in the early 1990s, also worked at NPR member station WXXI in Rochester, and is now in program marketing at National Public Radio in Washington.

Peter Lawley, WBFO staffer in the mid 1990s, is now a Buffalo area journalist.

Cindy Lawson, WBFO control board operator who was at the controls when WBFO began broadcasting January 6th 1959.

Bruce Leader, WBFO staffer in the early 1990s, is now a teacher at Starpoint Academy.

Stu Leger, WBFO engineer in the 1970s.

Malcolm Leigh, WBFO jazz host in the 1980s, became a sales associate at a Western New York auto dealership.

Dan Lenard commentator on Morning Edition

Rick Lesniak, WBFO classical music host in the 1970s, and occasional panelist on WBFO's Trivia programs in the early 1980s.

Steve Levinthal, WBFO classical music host and producer (The Esoteric Phonograph, along with Mike Horwood and Jerry Fink) from 1965 to 1970, and 1972 to 1977, was a high school English teacher for a couple of years, and now works for GM's Delphi Harrison plant in Lockport. Steve continues to pursue his love of broadcasting, serving as a part-time music announcer on WNED Buffalo/WNJA Jamestown, since they started airing classical music in 1977.

Doug Levy, WBFO staffer in the 1960s, is now a freelance writer in Buffalo, and a part-time music announcer on WNED Buffalo/WNJA Jamestown, and is a longtime supporter of WBFO.

Cathy Lewis, WBFO staffer in the early 1970s, has been a producer at "CBS Sunday Morning" since the mid 1980s.

Jack Lockhart (father of John), WBFO jazz host in the 1980s, was also a jazz host at the old WEBR in Buffalo.

John Lockhart (son of Jack), WBFO jazz host in the 1980s, was also a jazz host at the old WEBR in Buffalo.

Kristen Lord, WBFO News intern in the fall of 1998.

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Helen Macdonald, WBFO receptionist in the late 1980s.

Rich Malawista, WBFO classical music programmer in the 1960s and 1970s, is now Director of Broadcasting at public radio station WFCR-FM in Amherst Massachusetts.

Steve Mann, WBFO folk music host in the 1970s.

Lamont Maracle, WBFO jazz host in the 1980s.

Bill Maraschiello, WBFO folk music music host in the 1970s, is now a member of the Folk Singers Hall of Fame.

Tom Mardirosian

Gerry Matalan, WBFO news intern in the early 1980s, becamew a producer at ESPN Sports.

Todd McDermott, WBFO jazz host in the early 1980s, who also did a lot of data entry for our old computerized record library inventory, is now a news anchor/reporter at WUSA-TV in Washington DC. McDermott previously worked at WCBS-TV in New York, WMAR-TV in Baltimore, and KSNW-TV, the NBC affiliate in Wichita KS, where in 1997 he received the Edward R. Murrow Award for "A Common Thread," a thirty minute special on AIDS. He also worked at KSNF-TV, the NBC affiliate in Joplin MO after graduating from Canisius College.

Miguel Mendez, co-host of WBFO's Salsa program from 1987 to March 1998.

John Merino, host and producer of American Blues Hour on WBFO from 1976 to 1980, went on to Connecticut Public Radio and WWUH at the University of Hartford, where he won the New England Advocate Newspaper chain's first Honor Roll Award for his contribution to the arts through radio production. John served as Executive Director of NHS Inc. in Niagara Falls, NY, an Urban Development Corporation. He was the host and producer of the "Legends of the Falls" series on Adelphia Cable television.  He is now the Executive Director of the Gebbie Foundation in Jamestown.

Leza Mesiah has a lot of stories to tell!

    "I was at WBFO from 1971 to 1976. I was recruited by acting Station Manager/Program Director Maddy (Madeleine) Kaufman, soon after Bill Siemering left.

    The station had just started broadcasting at least till midnight and they needed people to be on the air. I remember that ‘BFO’ would go off the air, when the last person around midnight would turn off the transmitter. We were required to have a 3rd Class Engineering license. It was blue and I remember riding my bike back home after shutting the station down.

    During those years, I hosted everything from a Morning Preludes Classical Music show to being an original member of the 1971 "All Things Considered”" staff. I also created several music shows. My main show was "All My Trials," a folk music program that ran somewhere within the 11am - 2pm hour and "Ngwantanio," Music Of The 3rd Worlds People on Saturdays. I think right after my Saturday show was a Mexican Music show hosted by Tino Mejia. "All My Trials" show started out with the ‘Classical Gas’ acoustic guitar piece and I always ended with Joan Baez’s version of "All My Trials."

    Susan Stiefel Eastman was also on the air with a show called "East Meets West," Music Of The Occident and Orient. Susan was assistant station manager something and on a WBFO graduate scholarship there from about 1971-74 or so under Jim Campbell. She died in Dallas, Christmas Eve 1980, from cervical cancer.

    When I talked with Dave Benders a couple years ago, we had a good laugh when I asked him, "What was the name of the news show we did in the afternoon that I participated in?" He laughed and said, "Leza, That show was called All Things Considered." I worked on the weekends as a gopher at the Buffalo Evening News and WBEN, then Channel 4 and was always being complimented by the News Staff and Editorial Staff at how well I covered in depth news stories at BFO. At that time I remember doing news stories and the weather when the show was hosted by Mike Waters and Dave Karpoff.

    I think Bill Siemering had recently left to go to Washington and had something to do with its development. I left Buffalo in 1977 with a Masters in Communications from U.B.

    Somewhere in there I also worked driving the Money Car at Whistle (forgot the radio station call letters) as an on –air promotions person and WKBW on their weekend News and Public Affairs programming staff hosting a show called "The Senior Sentinel" before going into sales at WBEN Radio stations AM and FM (Rock 102). "The Senior Sentinel" show on people’s attitudes towards aging was a 52 week program tied into the City Of Dallas and also was my Masters Thesis project. The experience of interviewing all came from my 4 years of doing WBFO interviews from political figures to music acts.

    I know I was a student on the air during the time that Mike Waters, John "Smokey" Baer, Ira Flatow, Terry Gross, and Dave Karpoff. I also remember the names Dave Simon, Mitch Tannenbaum, Les Solomon, and Ed Smith being around. I also remember ‘Smokey’ introducing me to somebody at Moot Hall, who showed me what I believe to be the first Moog Synthesizer. I had no idea what effect it would have on music! I was also one of the Executive Directors of Schussmeisters Ski Club which was diagonally across the hall from the radio station when we were all in Norton Hall.

    Another cool think I did was to interview a lot of the music acts that came to campus that Sub-Board brought in. It was when Harvey Weinstein ran Sub-Board. Yes, the same Oscar winning producer Harvey Weinstein who founded Miramax pictures and now has the Weinstein Company. Those interviews included everybody from Bonnie Raitt, to Ritchie Havens to the Beach Boys.

    WBFO gave me my radio roots. In 1976 I went into sales at WBEN FM, Rock 102 at the time and have been in Radio Sales ever since. I’ve done hundreds of commercials down here and am in my 39th year in radio. I owe that to WBFO!"

Jack Mettauer, WBFO's first Program Director, when the station began broadcasting January 6th 1959.

Joseph Mianowany, WBFO sports reporter in the mid 1970s, UB Class of 1977, went on to become a correspondent for UPI (United Press International). He covered the Buffalo Sabres appearance in the 1975 Stanley Cup Finals for WBFO.

Larry Mietus, WBFO staffer in the early 1980s, is now a public speaking coach who owns and operates Speak Eazy Seminars in Buffalo.

John Miller, WBFO engineer in the mid 1970s, is now a DirectBand Network Engineer for Smart Personal Objects Technology with Microsoft.

Bob Mink, WBFO overnight classical music host in the early 1980s.

Sara Mirabito, WBFO jazz host and news correspondent in the late 1980s. After graduating from UB, she moved to Alaska and worked as a reporter for KSKA Public Radio. She later did stints for the Alaska Public Radio Network as well as public and commercial TV stations. During the mid-90's she moved to Seattle, and now runs a web site for MSN/Microsoft.

Darryl Mitchell, WBFO engineer in the 1980s.

Lauren Mook joined the WBFO team as an intern in 2008. She also served as Videographer for the Wednesday Night Concert series, and as a reporter for Buffalo Avenues.  From 2009 to 2010 she served as WBFO's Member Services Coordinator.

Edie Moore, WBFO news staffer, and alternate host of the Broadway/Hollywood program Soundstage on WBFO in the mid 1980s.

Tiffany Morrison, WBFO Underwriting Manager in the early 1990s, went on to NPR in Washington for a time.

Sally Anne Mosey, WBFO news staffer in the mid 1980s, went on to do television weather reports on WGRZ-TV Channel 2 in Buffalo, before moving out of town.

Maureen Muncaster, local WBFO Morning Edition host in the early 1980s.

Abdullah Muharram, WBFO jazz host in the 1980s.

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Frank Nelson, Jazz Host, Engineer, and Operations Manager at the Satellite Studio on Jefferson Avenue in the early 1970s, worked as an engineer in commercial radio in Boston for two decades. He is currently a Satellite Technician at National Public Radio in Washington, DC.

Howard Nelson, WBFO overnight classical music host in the 1980s.

Rich Newman, WBFO staffer in the early 1990s.

Corey Nieman, WBFO intern in the late 1990s.

Jim Nowicki, WBFO music host and producer in the 1980s, has worked at many Western New York radio stations, and with the Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority in Buffalo.

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Lisa Olson, WBFO bluegrass/country host in the early 1980s.

Ed O'Reilly, WBFO folk music host in the 1970s.

Kevin O'Shaughnessy, WBFO staffer in the early 1990s.

Larry Osolkowski, WBFO engineer/control board operator in the late 1960s; Larry built the Heathkit shortwave receiver used to rebroadcast BBC News live on WBFO, and helped wire new studios in Norton Hall. Larry is now a computer engineer in Tonawanda.

Mickey Osterreicher, WBFO control board operator in the late 1960s, was a photographer for the old Buffalo Courier-Express newspaper, and currently works as a cameraman for WKBW-TV Channel 7 in Buffalo. He is a graduate of the University at Buffalo Law School.

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Jim Palermo, WBFO Station Manager in the early 1960s, went on to several Buffalo-area broadcasting positions, working on-air for WJJL-AM, WADV-FM, and WKBW-TV (Channel 7). He was Promo the Robot and Pail Mac on Rocketship 7; he also wrote and appeared on the Fright Night Late Show, as The Ghoul, and worked in Traffic and Promotion. At WBEN-AM-FM-TV (Channel 4), he was a promotion manager and account executive, while completing a degree at UB's evening division. In 1968 he joined the National Labor Relations Board, and rose to Assistant to the Regional Director in Buffalo. He retired in July 2003, and now lives in Northampton MA.

Ann Pearce, WBFO commentator in the 1990s, is a writer who has moved from Buffalo to Los Angeles. Her commentaries are still heard from time to time on WBFO's Listener Commentary segment on Tuesday mornings.

John Penney, WBFO jazz host in the 1970s and 1980s, became a jazz radio host at NPR member station WDET in Detroit.

Greg Perla, pioneer WBFO jazz host in the 1960s, is now an attorney in Buffalo.

Jeff Pieczynski hosted The Sunday Polka Party

Ann Marie Plubell, classical music programmer 1969-1972, is now an attorney in Washington, DC.

David Posner, WBFO arts programmer when the station began broadcasting January 6th, 1959, host of the program Poetry Room.

Marc Poulin, WBFO computer programmer in the early 1990s.

Mike Powers, WBFO control board operator in the 1970s and 1980s.

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Larry Rakow, host of Gilbert and Sullivan Review on WBFO from 1968 - 1969, is now the owner of Wonder-Shirts and Wonderland Books in Cleveland Heights, Ohio.

Bud Ralabate, co-host of the WBFO oldies show When Rock Was Young in the mid 1970s (died September 1985).

Toni Randolph, WBFO News Director and local Morning Edition host in the early 1990s, went on to become a correspondent for NPR affiliate WBGO-FM in Newark, and is now a reporter at NPR affiliate WBUR-FM in Boston.

Ishmael Reed, WBFO jazz host when the station began broadcasting January 6th, 1959, host of the program Jazz In Commentary.

Allan Resman, WBFO jazz and classical music host and Assistant Music Director in the late 1960s, is now a physical therapist in Amherst.

J. R. Ried, WBFO staffer in the early 1960s, went on to a longtime career in Western New York commercial radio.

Dan Rigney, WBFO staffer in the early 1990s, worked at HallWalls Gallery in Buffalo for a time.

Mike Riley, local WBFO Morning Edition host in the early 1980s, is now an air personality at WJYE-FM in Buffalo.

Amy Roberts, WBFO marketing and development associate and intern in the early 1990s, served as Marketing Director for the public broadcasting newspaper Current for a time after leaving WBFO.

Sharon Roberts, WBFO Business Manager from 1991 to 1997.

Mary Ann Rogers, WBFO Director of Membership in the early 1990s, is now Associate Dean for Development in the University at Buffalo School of Law.

John Romer, WBFO's first Station Manager when the station began broadcasting January 6th, 1959.

Steve Rosenthal, WBFO music host in the 1970s and early 1980s, is a founding member and Executive Director of the Amherst Saxophone Quartet, which celebrated its 20th anniversary during 1998.

Ron Ross, WBFO rock music producer in the early 1980s.

Sheryl Ross, WBFO Development Director in the early 1980s.

Bob Rossberg, WBFO jazz host from 1977 until his passing May 5 1996. Bob was a longtime administrator and teacher at the University at Buffalo, and his big band show Sound of Swing, produced at WBFO, was nationally distributed by National Public Radio during the 1980s. Bob's programs were so well done that they continued to air on WBFO thorough July 2000. In addition, we are grateful to Bob's wife Mary for the 1997 donation of his jazz record collection to WBFO.

Harry Rossen, WBFO sportscaster when the station began broadcasting January 6th 1959.

Gus Russo, jazz host and producer on WBFO in the late 1960s and early 1970s, is now a photographer and musician.

Diane Ruszczyk worked at WBFO 1970 - 75 as an engineer and host of "Footlight Parade". She also worked part time at other Buffalo radio stations, and hosted a Polish community program on Cable TV. After leaving Buffalo, Diane worked as a news reporter and disc jockey at WTBQ in Warwick, NY, and as a TV News anchor & reporter at stations in Poughkeepsie and Middletown, NY. Since 1986, she has been a video editor, and producer at FOX affiliate KTTV in Los Angeles, occasionally appearing on camera. Diane also had careers as a model & dancer (teaching ballroom for the Fred Astaire studios, etc., and as a performer with the Matusz Polish Dance Company of NYC). More about Diane at: http://www.myspace.com/artemis2273 and http://lowiczanka.wordpress.com/.

Jennifer Roth, WBFO General Manager from 1990 until October 1999.

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Dan Sack: From 1967-1971, Dan was a WBFO engineer and control board operator, who produced taped and live lectures and concerts for broadcast; he also coordinated design and wiring of new WBFO studios in Norton Hall, and with Cliff Stoll installed the remote "Studio J" on Jefferson Avenue for regular broadcasts from Buffalo's African-American community. In 1977-1978, he mixed WBFO's live jazz concert series from the old Tralfamadore Cafe on Main Street, and in 1982, he designed and supervised construction and wiring of the WBFO studios returning to Baird (now Allen) Hall. Dan lives in Buffalo, and is now a freelance sound mixer (Pataphysics) for network television news and news magazine programs.

Fred and Arlene Sandner: Fred was a WBFO music programmer in the late 1960s; Arlene produced children's programming for WBFO in the early 1970s; both are now librarians in Rockland County New York.

Robert SanGeorge: a WBFO news producer from 1972-75, and in 1974-75 covered for NPR the trials of inmates involved with the Attica Prison riot. He now works for the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, as director of a global campaign to eliminate the worst forms of child labor.

Peggy Scalzo: Technical Director & Recording Engineer for OPUS: Classics, from '90-'99; General Audio Engineer (various projects - Meet the Author, cataloging reel-to-reel tape to digital, etc.) from '99 - '01; Currently: Musician (drummer) in the Buffalo area, doing web design, and freelance audio engineering around the area.

Rich Schaefer (brother of Rob Schaefer), WBFO bluegrass host in the early 1980s, is leader of the Western New York based bluegrass band Creek Bend.

Rob Schaefer (brother of Rich Schaefer), WBFO jazz host and Operations Director in the early 1980s, went on to the Mutual Radio network in suburban Washington, DC, and to National Public Radio in Washington.

Joanne Schlegel, Opus Classics producer

Todd Schlesinger, WBFO student assistant in the late 1980.

Eric Schoenfeld, WBFO news correspondent from 1969 to 1973 (he covered the Attica prison riots for WBFO in 1971), later became a television news producer for Buffalo stations WKBW Channel 7 and WGRZ Channel 2, and stations in Baltimore and Philadelphia. In 1989 he moved to ESPN to help create the program "Baseball Tonight;", later becoming General Manager of ESPN Radio, after serving as Senior Coordinating Producer of the network's web site.

Wayne Schuck, WBFO administrative assistant in the early 1990s.

Linda Scrivens, WBFO music host in the early 1990s.

Jim Sexton, WBFO news staffer in the early 1980s.

Peggy Shanahan, WBFO marketing and development associate and intern in the early 1990s.

Dr. Miriam Shuchman, NPR commentator for Weekend Edition Sunday in the mid 1990s, is a UB medical professor.

Bill Siemering, WBFO General Manager from 1962 to 1970, became National Public Radio's first program director, and created NPR's All Things Considered in 1971, based on the 1960's WBFO program This Is Radio.

Bob Sikorski, WBFO General Manager from 1980 to 1986, and host of the Broadway/Hollywood program SoundStage, is now director of the Radio Reading Service in Buffalo.

David F. Simon, assistant chief engineer for WBFO from 1971 to 1973 (UB School of Management, 1974), is Senior Vice President and General Counsel of the Jefferson Health System in Philadelphia and a member of the Executive Committee of the Board of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Dave and Fred Jacobowitz helped start UB's Carrier Current AM station WIRR.

Walter Simpson, commentator on Morning Edition

Abby Sinnott, WBFO volunteer in 1997, is now in San Francisco.

Tim Sledziewski, WBFO newscaster and Weekend Edition host in the mid 1980s.

Stan Sluberski, host of A Polka Sunday With Friends on WBFO from 1978 until 1993 (died October 12, 1997 at age 49).

Clip Smith, UB Bulls football play by play announcer on WBFO in the mid 1980s, worked for many years as a television sportscaster on WKBW Channel 7, and as a talk show host on WGR-AM and WBEN-AM in Buffalo. Died August 2004 in a car accident.

Ed Smith, WBFO jazz host in the 1970s and 1980s.

Les Solomon, WBFO classical music host in the 1970s.

David Sommerstein, WBFO producer in the mid 1990s, is now at North Country Public Radio in Canton New York, after serving as Program Director of NPR affiliate KRZA-FM, "Relevant Radio" for Alamosa, Colorado and Taos, New Mexico.

Phil Sottile, WBFO blues and folk music host in the early 1980s. Phil currently lives in Bellingham Washington, and is guitarist for the regional band Twang Factor 4.

Martin Spinelli, WBFO news staffer, and local host of Weekend Edition in the early 1990s. After leaving WBFO, Martin earned his PhD through UB's English Department. Since producing the LINEbreak literary series first heard on WBFO, Martin has continued to produce innovative radio heard on the ABC (Australia), the BBC, and on independent and networked stations throughout Europe and North America. The best of these have been included in the permanent collection of the Museum of Television and Radio in New York and Los Angeles. Martin also publishes and lectures on media and radio art.

Ed Sporn, WBFO newscaster in the late 1960s (UB Geography BA 1972), is now vice president of Administration for D. E. Shaw and Company, an investment bank in New York City, and lives in Pelham New York with his wife and two children. Ed writes, "I worked at WBFO as a newscaster and newsman in 1968 and 1969. I would introduce the BBC news at 6 and then follow-up with the local and national news off the wires. My two most significant memories were reading the 1968 election results -- when Nixon beat Humphrey -- and covering the Gov. Rockefeller's groundbreaking of the Amherst campus. I wandered over to the governor, microphone in hand to get an interview. I was set upon by a state trooper who hit me in the stomach with his nightstick. I was wearing press tags at the time, but all the trooper saw was some bearded long-hair approaching the governor. Rockefeller was quite solicitous when things were sorted out and gave me a 30 second interview."

C. G. "Kayo" Stolarski, WBFO engineer in the 1970s and early 1980s, went on to become Chief Engineer at NPR member station KLON in Long Beach California, where he was assisted by another WBFO alumnus, Wally Gajewski (Kayo died June 30 1995 at age 47)

Cliff Stoll, WBFO's Assistant Chief Engineer in the early 1970s, is now an astronomer, author (The Cuckoo's Egg, Silicon Snake Oil, and High Tech Heretic), entrepreneur and computer expert in Berkeley California.

Gary Storm, WBFO music host in the 1970s (Oil of Dog), went to the old WZIR-FM in Buffalo in the early 1980s, and is now an attorney in Santa Fe New, Mexico.

Carol Anne Stripple, WBFO news staffer in the mid 1980s.

Frank Sundram, WBFO staffer in the early 1970s, is currently manager of public radio station WKGC in Panama City Florida.

Gail Marks Sutton, WBFO administrative assistant in the late 1980s, and Vinyl Madness coordinator in the mid 1990s.

 

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Mitch Tanenbaum, WBFO Chief Engineer from 1973 to 1975, who recorded many concerts for broadcast on WBFO. Mitch started at WBFO as a volunteer in 1971, after volunteering at WBAI in New York City. He became WBFO Assistant Chief Engineer a year later. Mitch moved to Los Angeles to be an engineer for Capitol Records; he now works as a maintenance engineer at CBS Television in LA. Mitch writes, "As it must be for most volunteers and staffers at BFO, my time there was both exciting and very rewarding. The skills I learned, both technical and programming, have served me well in my present career." Mitch adds, "My ego would be largely assuaged if at the end it said something like 'and is currently one of the world's great sailors.' This credit could also be applied to the bios of Mark Fruehauf and Cathy Lewis, by the way. They, however, have other, more important stuff written about them. I need all the help I can get."

Mable Tartt Sumpter, WBFO receptionist in the 1980s, is now Manager of Conference Registration Services with the Office of Conferences and Special Events at the University at Buffalo.

Adrian Tate, WBFO blues host in the mid 1990s, later worked for a time at WHTT-FM in Buffalo.

Henry Tenenbaum, WBFO's Music Director and Program Director in the 1960s, is now a television personality at KRON-TV in San Francisco; he was also known as Henry Lawrence while a correspondent on WKBW Channel 7 in Buffalo in the early 1970s.

G. Scott Thomas, WBFO News Director in the 1980s, also worked at NPR News in Washington, and public radio stations WEBR in Buffalo and WXXI in Rochester. He is now projects editor at Business First newspaper in Buffalo.

Jennifer Timkey, WBFO staffer in the mid 1990s.

Maria Todd, WBFO local Morning Edition host in the mid 1980s, went on to become a radio host at WMJQ-FM in Buffalo before moving to KRBE-FM in Houston, Texas.

Bill Tourot, "Uncle Bill," WBFO music host in the mid 1980s.

Thurman Trapp, host of the jazz show Street Life on WBFO in the 1970s and 1980s, was also a novelist and activist in Buffalo's African-American community (died August 18 1995 at age 53).

Steven T. Truesdale, WBFO news staffer in the late 1980s, is now assistant director of RERC (Rehabillitation Engineering Research Center) Universal Design @ Buffalo

Barry Tuch, WBFO Operations Assistant in the early 1980s.

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Mike Uchacz, WBFO intern in the mid 1990s.

Chris Ulanowski, WBFO news staffer in the early 1980s, has been news and public affairs director for many years at NPR member station WRVO, from the State University of New York College at Oswego.

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Alex van Oss, WBFO staffer in the 1970s, is now a correspondent for National Public Radio.

Mary Van Vorst, Spoken Arts producer

James Vetter, WBFO's first Business Manager, when the station began broadcasting January 6th 1959.

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Al Wadowski, WBFO control board operator from the mid 1980s until 1997 (died April 19th 1999 at age 71).

Kate Waffner, WBFO News intern in the spring of 1998.

Linda Wagner, WBFO producer and Promotion and Development Coordinator from 1976 to 1979, is now with Consumer Reports magazine.

Tim Wagner, WBFO music host in the mid 1990s.

Bill Wahl, WBFO jazz host in the 1970s.

Josh Walker, WBFO News intern in the fall of 1998.

Gary Walters, WBFO staffer in the early 1990s, also served as a television cameraman for WGRZ-TV in Buffalo and for Buffalo Sabres hockey telecasts.

Bill Ward, WBFO News Director in the early 1960s, succeeded Jim Palermo as Station Manager when this "new kid," Bill Siemering, showed up. Bill Ward diverged from radio for about 35 years or so, and now is Security and Safety Manager at National Public Radio (Bill's e-mail at NPR is bward@npr.org, just in case you want to hear more about that era as we transitioned from UB to SUNYAB in 1962).

Vincent Ware, WBFO jazz host in the early 1980s.

Mike Waters, WBFO news staffer in the 1960s, went on to become an early host of NPR's All Things Considered in Washington (died September 14, 2000 at age 69).

Jack Waugh, WBFO's first Chief Engineer, when the station began broadcasting January 6th, 1959.

Hillel Weinberg was a news staffer from 1969 through the early 70s and reported on the very beginnings of the campus disturbances of 1970. He eventually served as staff director of the Committee on International Relations of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Jonathon Welch, WBFO reggae host in the 1990s, is a long time underwriter on WBFO as the proprietor of Talking Leaves Books in Buffalo.

Ken Wells, WBFO control board operator in the late 1960s, now works in the telecommunications industry in Naperville, Illinois.

Tim Wenger, WBFO news staffer in the mid 1980s, is currently news director of WBEN-AM in Buffalo.

John Werick, WBFO jazz host from 1979 to 1995 and Music Director from 1986 to 1994, plays bass with the Buffalo jazz bands Nickel City Clippers (headed by Ted Howes, host of At The Jazz Band Ball on WBFO) and Four Point Play. In the early 1980s, John was also a jazz host at the old WEBR in Buffalo.

Paul Wieland, WBFO commentator in the 1980s, produced cable television broadcasts for the NHL's Buffalo Sabres before becoming Executive Director of Fitchburg Access Television in Fitchburg Massachusetts.

Fred Winters, WBFO Chief Engineer in the early 1970s, is now deceased.

Howard Wolf, WBFO commentator in the 1980s (under the pseudonym Howard Twichell), is a UB English professor recently back from South Africa.

Dan and Laura Wolfe, WBFO staffers in the early 1980s.

David Wright, WBFO news reporter and intern in 1989, went on to become a public radio correspondent in Boston and California, and a technology correspondent for HotWired columnist; he now reports on politics and social issues for KRON-TV in San Francisco.

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Rachel Zach, WBFO music host in the mid 1990s.

Keith Zehr, WBFO bluegrass host in the early 1990s.

Floyd Zgoda, WBFO blues host in the early 1980s.

Anita Zigman was a classical music programmer/announcer in the '70s (UB alum, BA in music, 1977). The program was called Prelud and aired on Wednesday mornings. She is married to another UB alum, Jeff Slotnick, (BA in media studies, 1973). After Buffalo, she moved to NYC and worked in classical music management for Columbia Artists Management for a number of years. She is now a "recovering lawyer," working as the chief legal personnel officer of a large law firm in Manhattan and live, along with Jeff, two teenage sons and a large golden retriever named Leo in the NYC suburbs. She still looks back with very fond memories of those Wednesday mornings at WBFO.

Stan Zurek, WBFO control board operator in the early 1980s.

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